Educational/Dermatology


Informational drafts on Dermatological subjects in a complete and simplified form.
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Educational/Dermatology - Seborrheic keratosis: a fastidious aesthetic disturbance
SEBORRHEIC KERATOSIS


Seborrheic keratosis:a fastidious aesthetic disturbance

Although they are known as seborrheic keratosis or a seborrheic verrucas (warts), these abnormal epidermal growths with the appearance of verrucous vegetations have nothing to do with the sebacious glands or sebum.Clinical appearance


They present as rough, greyish and sometimes desquamating verrucosities that are not painful but sometimes give rise to itching.
They may be isolated or widespread.

In the latter case, the aesthetic disturbance is considerable.
They mainly appear on the trunk and face...



Small lesions of seborrheic keratosis that will grow like the one in the centre.
There are sometimes very few but highly verrucous lesions whose size and appearance are worrying for patients.



They mainly appear on the trunk and face…







… and cause a sense of early aging.


Seborrheic keratosis begins with the onset of small grey papules that are initially hardly visible but tend to grow over time and take on an increasingly verrucous appearance.




Small lesions of seborrheic keratosis that will grow like the one in the centre.


There are sometimes very few but highly verrucous lesions whose size and appearance are worrying for patients.



In some subjects with a familial predisposition, they tend to be numerous and grow so rapidly that, in addition to being visually disturbing, create problems in terms of dressing and washing. In such cases, it is necessary to remove the lesions.




The lesions of seborrheic keratosis are benign, and are removed for aesthetic reasons (the sense of aging) or functional purposes (when they rub or give rise to itching).
However, it is necessary to undergo a dermatological examination in order to be sure they are seborrheic keratosis lesions and not due to another disease. In the case of doubt, dermatologists use s dermascope to confirm the diagnosis.


Women are more frequently affected than men. The first lesions appear at an average age of about 50 years, but they can frequently be seen as early as 30 years.
The photograph below shows a 30-year-old woman with a number of obvious lesions, but also a myriad of smaller lesions that have recently appeared but will inevitably grow.



Why intervene?
Seborrheic keratosis lesions are by definition benign and not subject to tumoral growth, and could therefore remain untreated. However, it is advisable to have them removed above all for aesthetic reasons, but also because the operation is very simple.

       

When to intervene?
It is a good idea to consult a dermatologist and have them removed as soon as you become aware of their presence because the smaller they are, the better the aesthetic result.


How to intervene?
As the lesions are not deep but only affect the surface of the skin, there is no need for a bistoury, laser electrobistoury or cryotherapy (cold treatment).


The standard intervention is curettage.

This is performed using a ring-shaped curette that allows the lesions to be removed without anesthesia and without leaving any signs of a scar.
It is done in an outpatient setting, and dozens of lesions can be removed in a single session.





It takes a weak for the skin to heal and skin repair is without scarring